0

My Donation Summary

0
Subtotal: $0.00
No products in the cart.

About Our Work

Our mission: To improve the lives of individuals and families affected by the war in Yemen through a range of sustainable projects, providing tangible results with a positive impact.
We are a non-governmental, 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to alleviating the suffering caused by the ongoing conflict in Yemen.

Officially established in New York City in 2018

from its more informal beginnings in 2015, HRD is the result of friends and community pulling together to find a way to help those less fortunate. Losing loved ones throughout the war ignited our desire to help others in Yemen who have suffered through meaningful initiatives. Our initial project was opening Mercy Bakeries with the goal to provide at least 2,000 loaves of bread a day to families in need.

We approach all our initiatives with a family-helping-family philosophy, as everything we do makes an impact on the life of every family member. Our team is made up of staff and volunteers who are passionate about development and fostering change, particularly those living in the communities where we work. Our mission is to improve the lives of individuals and families affected by the war in Yemen and other parts of the world through a range of sustainable projects, providing tangible results with a positive impact. We are registered on GuideStar, which reports on the transparency of nonprofit organizations and provides more information about us.

Yemen

Since early 2015, Yemen has faced a civil war and the devastating consequences of what the UN describes as the largest humanitarian crises in the world. Before the conflict, Yemen was already the poorest country in the Middle East and North Africa region. With an economy traditionally reliant on oil and gas, lack of other forms of revenue, coupled with stalled economic reforms, have resulted in the nation’s Central Bank not being able to support imports of critical goods. The country is also dealing with rising inflation and businesses laying people off their jobs.

In Yemen, 80% of the population is need of humanitarian aid and protection More than 3 million have been displaced from their home since 2015 58% of the population is living in extreme poverty.

Since early 2015, Yemen has faced a civil war and the devastating consequences of what the UN describes as the largest humanitarian crises in the world. Before the conflict, Yemen was already the poorest country in the Middle East and North Africa region. With an economy traditionally reliant on oil and gas, lack of other forms of revenue, coupled with stalled economic reforms, have resulted in the nation’s Central Bank not being able to support imports of critical goods. The country is also dealing with rising inflation and businesses laying people off their jobs.

On top of that, lack of clean water has led to the largest modern cholera outbreak and the COVID-19 pandemic is spreading across the country. As a result, an already fragile medical system with medicine shortages is facing more challenges and a strained capacity.

Malnutrition Crisis

Child malnutrition in Yemen is amongst the highest in the world. Over 2 million Yemeni children are in acute need and threats of famine plague the nation. Displacement and hunger are a direct effect of the war that will only be eliminated upon ending the conflict.

Since 2018, HRD has been working directly with the Yemeni people to listen to their needs and build programs that will fill in the gaps affecting their living situations in areas like food security, clean water access, and livelihood development with government support.

By purchasing supplies from inside Yemen, HRD is supporting the local economy and helps individuals obtain sustainable food through baking fresh bread and other foods with projects like Mercy Bakeries and Mercy Kitchens by serving meals to those most in need.

HRD is working tirelessly to build community relationships and reach those in need, but more support will help increase services to scale up our work in Yemen and the globe.

Pakistan

- Over 20% of the population is undernourished
- 44% of children under the age of 5 are stunted
- 8 million people were displaced during the 2022 floods

According to the national nutrition survey 2018, 36.9% of the population of Pakistan faces food insecurity. This is largely due to the poorest and most vulnerable of the population, particularly women, not having the necessary access to an adequate and diverse diet.

Children are also feeling the impact of food insecurity, with 18% of children under the age of five suffering from acute malnutrition. Of that same age group, over a quarter (29%) are underweight. Just one in seven children aged between six and 23 months is accessing a meal with minimum dietary diversity, which should include four different food groups, while 82% of children are going without the minimum number of meals a day.

Climate change in the region also remains a concern, with the aftermath of the devastating 2022 floodings impacting 33 million people, or one in seven Pakistanis. An additional nine million people risk being pushed into poverty as an impact from the floods, and the rates of child malnutrition remain a concern.

Following the floods, we immediately stepped into action and started to provide those impacted with food and shelter. We now have a Mercy Bakery and Mercy Kitchen in Kharian, and we also provide monthly food baskets, and we are looking to open new bakeries and kitchens in other parts of the country; Turkiye, Peru, Honduras

0
    0
    Your Donation Cart
    Your cart is empty